The Fantastic Four of Superhero Training Managers

Are great training managers born or trained? I don’t know. Probably both. Below is my short list of those things that separate the good from the great managers.

1. Secure. Most leaders are not secure enough to lead leaders. Anyone can lead followers. My teenage son can tell people to “shut up and do what I say”. That won’t work with leaders. What they want is to be a part of the entire process and they want to be able to chart their own course. To lead the top performers you simply give them an objective, a deadline, and get out of their way.

2. Strategic. A great manager will relentlessly pursue management until they understand the Firm’s strategic objectives and how training can with them. After they understand these objectives they will begin to implement them and tie them back to ROI.

3. Servant. A great manager will not sit back and delegate. They will work arm in arm with their team. One of their top objectives will be how to make their teammates wildly successful.

4. Soft spoken. If you have to push your authority, you don’t have any. The higher you go in an organization, the softer you need to speak. These are two statements which have guided my thoughts and actions. A superhero training manager will understand the Firm’s objectives, balance those against the needs and desires or their team, and gently, yet firmly lead them in that direction.

What does your list look like? Do you know any Superhero Managers? Sound off in comments.

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One thought on “The Fantastic Four of Superhero Training Managers

  1. Excellent article, Craig. Two insightful parts struck me: "What they want is to be a part of the entire process and they want to be able to chart their own course." and "If you have to push your authority, you don't have any. The higher you go in an organization, the softer you need to speak." Most managers and leaders would do well to follow those two bits of advice – but few rarely do!